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colt-kun:

rabidauthor:

2srooky:

shanellbklyn:

cold-fury:

One of the best moments of my childhood.

I can’t even tell you how excited I was that they turned this book into a movie and it was good

I literally have absolutely no complaints with the movie at all. Once, my friend and I did comparisons from the book and the movie, and we found the only major difference was the fact that Stanley wasn’t heavy set when he arrived at the camp in the movie. The majority of the script is raw quotations from the book.
This is my favorite book to movie adaptation and it did everything Percy Jackson, Inkheart, and The Golden Compass didn’t.

And the only reason Stanely wasn’t heavy set was because in the book he loses tons of weight and eventually ends up being almost thin. The director said he didn’t want to force an adolescent boy to lose weight on such a quick filming schedule, and L’bouf’s audition was so spot on, that they decided to go with a thinner Stanely from the beginning

And I’ll support directors actually giving a crap about their actor’s health.

(Source: reginamillsurl)

night-catches-us:

kb-saransar:

"According to the FBI, there have been 129 confirmed white Christian terrorists in the last 20 years. That includes Timothy McVae, the uni-bomber, the Atlanta Olympics bomber and dozens of family planning centers and abortion clinics. Muslims? 19. Which would make white people the most likely demographic to commit a terrorist attack. So watch your mouth before you call me a terrorist or I’ll knock your fucking teeth out.

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73r:

rrosequartz:

destructive-creature:

"At Rio Americano High School in Sacramento CA, a student named Dejza, was violently assaulted by a vice principal, Matt Collier, for attempting to take back a piece of art with a political message that the administration didn’t like. She was put in a chokehold and slammed against the desk. When she tried to resist this unlawful abuse of authority, she was slammed and held onto the ground. Matt Collier laid on top of her, crushing her with his weight. Dejza could not breathe, and begged Collier to get off of her. Luckily, another faculty member came in and ended the situation. Dejza went to see a doctor for severe whiplash, and yesterday was her first day of physical therapy. Despite this being blatantly wrong and illegal, the administration has put her on suspension for resisting, and Collier was not disciplined. On the fifth day of her suspension, she will attend a meeting held by bias members of the administration to determine if she will be expelled.

They have tried to silence anyone who speaks out on social media, but today we have gathered in person for a silent sit-in protest.

Dejza has been wronged, and brutalized, and now she is receiving punishment. They’ve tried to silence her. They’ve tried to silence us.” -Grant Wright 

One of my friends Grant posted this on facebook and even though im not in Sacramento I want to help. This girl has been mistreated by a full grown man who may never be punished. I want to help spread awareness. So please, spread this around. Let people know that this is NOT okay. The more support we have, the better. 

i’m so proud to have been a part of this today but you guys please please please please reblog/spread this around any way you possibly can it’s so important and her story needs to be heard by people outside of our city because what this man did is so so so incredibly far from okay

arrest Matt Collier. protect and redeem Dejza.

wheresagnes:

aztec-princesss:

gohomeluhan:

As I’m walking through Target with my little sister, the kid somehow manages to convince me to take a trip down the doll aisle. I know the type - brands that preach diversity through displays of nine different variations of white and maybe a black girl if you’re lucky enough. What I instead found as soon as I turned into the aisle were these two boxes.

The girl on the left is Shola, an Afghani girl from Kabul with war-torn eyes. Her biography on the inside flap tells us that “her country has been at war since before she was born”, and all she has left of her family is her older sister. They’re part of a circus, the one source of light in their lives, and they read the Qur’an. She wears a hijab.

The girl on the right is Nahji, a ten-year-old Indian girl from Assam, where “young girls are forced to work and get married at a very early age”. Nahji is smart, admirable, extremely studious. She teaches her fellow girls to believe in themselves. In the left side of her nose, as tradition mandates, she has a piercing. On her right hand is a henna tattoo.

As a Pakistani girl growing up in post-9/11 America, this is so important to me. The closest thing we had to these back in my day were “customizable” American Girl dolls, who were very strictly white or black. My eyes are green, my hair was black, and my skin is brown, and I couldn’t find my reflection in any of those girls. Yet I settled, just like I settled for the terrorist jokes boys would throw at me, like I settled for the butchered pronunciations of names of mine and my friends’ countries. I settled for a white doll, who at least had my eyes if nothing else, and I named her Rabeea and loved her. But I still couldn’t completely connect to her.

My little sister, who had been the one to push me down the aisle in the first place, stopped to stare with me at the girls. And then the words, “Maybe they can be my American Girls,” slipped out of her mouth. This young girl, barely represented in today’s society, finally found a doll that looks like her, that wears the weird headscarf that her grandma does and still manages to look beautiful.

I turned the dolls’ boxes around and snapped a picture of the back of Nahji’s. There are more that I didn’t see in the store; a Belarusian, an Ethiopian, a Brazilian, a Laotian, a Native American, a Mexican. And more.

These are Hearts 4 Hearts dolls, and while they haven’t yet reached all parts of the world (I think they have yet to come out with an East Asian girl), they need all the support they can get so we can have a beautiful doll for every beautiful young girl, so we can give them what our generation never had.

Please don’t let this die. If you know a young girl, get her one. I know I’m buying Shola and Nahji for my little sister’s next birthday, because she needs a doll with beautiful brown skin like hers, a doll who wears a hijab like our older sister, a doll who wears real henna, not the blue shit white girls get at the beach.

The Hearts 4 Hearts girls are so important. Don’t overlook them. Don’t underestimate them. These can be the future if we let them.

You can read more about the dolls here: http://www.playmatestoys.com/brands/hearts-for-hearts-girls

*runs to target- i need to get my babydoll one for her 1st bday

ohmygosh and the one from Ethiopia has natural hair which you can’t get from the American Girl “just like you” dolls!

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